Nature: …you need to see those stunning lightshows of the cosmic energies!!!

Simply breathtaking…I am crazy about the Aurora Borealis…

Now that’s a light show! Photographer captures spectacular Aurora Borealis in Norway after two years hunting for the perfect location

  • Norwegian photographer Tor-Ivar Naess became fascinated by the colour range of the Aurora Borealis 
  • The 31-year-old from Nordreisa in Norway didn’t have to travel far from his home to produce shots
  • Once in the best spot Tor-Ivar can spend up to eight hours there waiting for the perfect picture 

Ethereal: Areas that are not subject to 'light pollution' are the best places to watch for the lights from like this image taken in Storslett

More transfixing images of the Northern Lights in Storslett (left) and Djupvik (right) taken by the 31-year-old Norwegian photographer

More:

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-2902023/Now-s-light-Photographer-captures-spectacular-Northern-Lights-Norway-years-hunting-perfect-location.html

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England: Zauberhafte Überraschung am Himmel!

Polarlicht über dem Leuchtturm von Bamburgh: Seltenes Schauspiel in Northumberland

picture alliance/ PA Wire/ Owen Humphreys

Polarlicht über dem Leuchtturm von Bamburgh: Seltenes Schauspiel in Northumberland

Der Norden Englands ist zu Weihnachten in den Genuss eines seltenen Naturschauspiels gekommen: Am Himmel erstrahlten Polarlichter, die sonst nur viel weiter nördlich zu sehen sind.

Polarlichter bekommen für gewöhnlich nur wenige Bewohner Europas zu Gesicht. Die spektakulären Himmelserscheinungen sind meist nur über Skandinavien, Kanada, Alaska und Sibirien zu sehen. Doch an Heiligabend reichten die Lichterscheinungen ungewöhnlich tief in den Süden bis in den Nordosten von England. Am frühen Mittwochmorgen erstrahlte der Himmel dort in bunten Farben. Fotografen konnten das Schauspiel etwa bei Bamburgh in der Grafschaft Northumberland dokumentieren.

Scotland: The beauty of the visible cosmic energy

Tripping the light fantastic: Amazing pictures capture a stunning display of the Northern Lights off the coast of Scotland

  • Spectacular images of aurora borealis were taken by photographer Maciej Winiarczyk in Caithness, north Scotland
  • Displays were also visible from England last night – which is extremely unusual so far from the North Pole
  • Thought that large solar explosion forced electrically-charged particles, which cause the phenomenon, further south  

By Jack Crone for MailOnline

These stunning photos capture the spectacular scenes in Scotland last night – where the Northern Lights illuminated the sky with colour.

The deep purple and green bands of shimmering light were caught by award-winning photographer Maciej Winiarczyk – who spends much of his time snapping the aurora borealis.

The pictures were taken in Caithness, north Scotland – where people were treated to an extraordinary rare glimpse of the phenomenon.

Scroll down for video 

The pictures were taken in Caithness in the north of Scotland - where people were treated to a rare glimpse on the phenomenon

The pictures were taken in Caithness in the north of Scotland – where people were treated to a rare glimpse on the phenomenon

Mr Winiarczyk said: ‘Every aurora display is unique and you never know how it will develop over time.

‘It’s always intriguing and awe-inspiring and it’s a very photogenic subject. I really like the dynamism of the whole spectacle.

More here/video:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2754613/Incredible-pictures-capture-Northern-Lights-coast-Scotland.html

Aurora Borealis

Look up at the sky tomorrow! Huge X-class solar flare unleashed by sun over the weekend could create stunning auroras

  • The solar flare peaked at 5:48pm GMT (1:48 pm EDT) on March 29
  • It caused a radio disturbance and sent off a plasma cloud that will hit Earth
  • Scientists said it will only deliver a ‘glancing blow’ to the planet tomorrow and will not seriously affect communication systems
  • The aurora may be seen at higher latitudes but it is not entirely clear how far south they could be seen

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2594079/Look-sky-tomorrow-Huge-X-class-solar-flare-unleashed-sun-weekend-create-stunning-auroras.html

Magic sky

Image of the Day

http://www.space.com/34-image-day.html?cmpid=556782

Breathtaking Beauty: The Aurora Borealis – The Norfolk lights!

The Norfolk lights! Skies over East Anglia turn red and green by stunning display of the Aurora Borealis

  • Such light displays in the sky often occur in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, but illuminated parts of UK last night
  • Northern Lights are caused by collision of particles from the sun with atoms in Earth’s high-altitude atmosphere
  • Stargazers in Norfolk, Essex, South Wales, Cumbria and Scotland treated to stunning display of Aurora Borealis

By Amie Keeley and Sophie Jane Evans

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Britain’s skies were lit up red and green last night as a spectacular display of the Northern Lights illuminated parts of the country.

Stargazers in Norfolk, Essex, South Wales, Cumbria and parts of Scotland were treated to stunning views of the Aurora Borealis.

Pictures show a red and green sky littered with stars caused by the collision of electronically charged particles with atoms in the high altitude atmosphere.

Scroll down for video

Different colours: Stargazers in Foxley, Norfolk, were treated to a stunning display of the Aurora Borealis that lit up the sky last night

Different colours: Stargazers in Foxley, Norfolk, were treated to a stunning display of the Aurora Borealis that lit up the sky last night

Captivating: Skies over Loch Brora in the Scottish Highlands turn red and green by a mesmerising display of the Aurora Borealis

Captivating: Skies over Loch Brora in the Scottish Highlands turn red and green by a mesmerising display of the Aurora Borealis

 

 

 
 
Bright: People across the UK revelled in a rare glimpse of the Northern Lights - stretching as far down as East Anglia. Above, the sky turns pink and yellow

Bright: People across the UK revelled in a rare glimpse of the Northern Lights – stretching as far down as East Anglia. Above, the sky turns pink and yellow

 

 

 
 
Swirl of colour: Photographer Stewart Watt captures the Aurora Borealis lighting up the sky over the small town of Thurso in Caithness, Scotland, during the night

Swirl of colour: Photographer Stewart Watt captures the Aurora Borealis lighting up the sky over the small town of Thurso in Caithness, Scotland, during the night

 

 
Historic: The sky lights up red above Stonehaven War Mermorial in Aberdeen

Historic: The sky lights up red above Stonehaven War Mermorial in Aberdeen

 

Unbelieveable: The Northern Lights display at Inverkirkaig, near Lochinver in Sutherlandshire, Scotland. The display lasted for two hours before clouds obscured them

Unbelieveable: The Northern Lights display at Inverkirkaig, near Lochinver in Sutherlandshire, Scotland. The display lasted for two hours before clouds obscured them

Starry-eyed: The stars are caused by the collision of electronically charged particles with atoms in the high altitude atmosphere

Starry-eyed: The stars are caused by the collision of electronically charged particles with atoms in the high altitude atmosphere

 

 

Stunning: The Northern Lights were also visible in the North East of England. Above, the Aurora Borealis light up the sky near Hallbankgate in North Cumbria

Stunning: The Northern Lights were also visible in the North East of England. Above, the Aurora Borealis light up the sky near Hallbankgate in North Cumbria

 

 
Out of this world: And they also appeared over areas of Scotland, such as Carrbridge in Inverness-shire (pictured)

Out of this world: And they also appeared over areas of Scotland, such as Carrbridge in Inverness-shire (pictured)

 

Twitter user and meteorologist, Chris Bell, posted a stunning photograph from his home in Foxley, Norfolk at around 8pm last night.

Mark Thompson, presenter of Stargazing Live, told the BBC: ‘What happens is there is stuff called the solar wind, which is electronically charged particles, and they take two or three days to get here and when they do get here they cause the gas atoms in the sky to glow. It is as simple as that.’

 

Such light displays in the sky often occur in the Arctic and Antarctic regions and are caused by the collision of particles from the sun entering the earth’s atmosphere.

However, they could be seen in various parts of the country last night, including Whitely Bay in North Tyneside, where a lighthouse could be seen shining brightly.

 

 

 

 
 
Spectacular: People watch the Northern Lights, dance over St. Mary's Lighthouse in Whitely Bay just outside Newcastle

Spectacular: People watch the Northern Lights, dance over St. Mary’s Lighthouse in Whitely Bay just outside Newcastle

 

 
Lit up: The lighthouse appears to light up as a collision of particles from the sun enter the earth's atmosphere

Lit up: The lighthouse appears to light up as a collision of particles from the sun enter the earth’s atmosphere

 
Watching in awe: A man watches the spectacular array of lights, which have caused the lighthouse to gleam a blinding shade of white

Watching in awe: A man watches the spectacular array of lights, which have caused the lighthouse to gleam a blinding shade of white

Hard to believe: The Northern Lights fill the sky with an eerie green above Ayr, Scotland, last night

Hard to believe: The Northern Lights fill the sky with an eerie green above Ayr, Scotland, last night

 

Gleaming: The Aurora Borealis, or the Northern Lights as they are commonly known, at St Mary's Lighthouse and Visitor Centre in Whitely Bay, North Tyneside

Gleaming: The Aurora Borealis, or the Northern Lights as they are commonly known, at St Mary’s Lighthouse and Visitor Centre in Whitely Bay, North Tyneside

Visible: Such light displays in the sky often occur in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, but they were visible in North Tyneside

Visible: Such light displays in the sky often occur in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, but they were visible in North Tyneside

 

 
Amazing: A sightseer points at the Northern Lights at Embleton Bay in Northumberland

Amazing: A sightseer points at the Northern Lights at Embleton Bay in Northumberland

 

 
Colourful: The bay was lit up with purple, blue and green colours as millions of particles entered the earth's atmosphere

Colourful: The bay was lit up with purple, blue and green colours as millions of particles entered the earth’s atmosphere

 

 

The lights were also captured by photographers above Scotland-based homes in Carrbrige in Inverness-shire, and Inverkirkaig, near Lochinver in Sutherlandshire.

Mr Thompson said the aurora over Britain had been expected, after a burst of activity on the sun around four days ago, but that it had been brighter than expected.

‘Aurora displays usually happen around the North and South poles, so to see them this far south is pretty rare,’ he told the Eastern Daily Press.

‘I haven’t seen one like that in Norfolk for about 20 years.’

Beautiful: The Northern Lights are pictured over a house, garden and greenhouse in Carrbridge, Inverness-shire

Beautiful: The Northern Lights are pictured over a house, garden and greenhouse in Carrbridge, Inverness-shire

 

 
 
Mesmerising: A beautiful display of lights is pictured above the house in Carrbridge - giving the property warm yellow glow

Mesmerising: A beautiful display of lights is pictured above the house in Carrbridge – giving the property warm yellow glow

 

Spectators: Dozens of people gathered to watch the breathtaking display of lights at Whitely Bay in North Tyneside last night

Spectators: Dozens of people gathered to watch the breathtaking display of lights at Whitely Bay in North Tyneside last night

Daylight: The night appears to turn into day as the lights shine over St Mary's Lighthouse in Whitely Bay

Daylight: The night appears to turn into day as the lights shine over St Mary’s Lighthouse in Whitely Bay

 

 

 
Mark Thompson told the BBC: 'The electronically charged particles take two or three days to get here' Above, the Northern Lights at Sycamore Gap, Hadrian's Wall

Mark Thompson told the BBC: ‘The electronically charged particles take two or three days to get here’ Above, the Northern Lights at Sycamore Gap, Hadrian’s Wall

 

 
 

 

He added: 'When they do get here they cause the gas atoms in the sky to glow. It is as simple as that'

He added: ‘When they do get here they cause the gas atoms in the sky to glow. It is as simple as that’

 

The aurora was due to last for several hours before fading during the early hours of this morning.

‘Scientifically, we don’t learn a lot from aurora borealis – they are just nice to look at,’ he added.

‘But I’m writing a book on astonomical photography at the moment and, as luck would have it, I got the chance to get some pictures of my own.’

The Aurora Borealis or as most people know them as the Northern Lights, is giving spectacular displays, lighting up the skies over the UK under clear skies

The Aurora Borealis or as most people know them as the Northern Lights, is giving spectacular displays, lighting up the skies over the UK under clear skies

Breathtaking: A streak of red can be seen in the sky as dozens of rocks rest on Embleton Bay in Northumberland below

Breathtaking: A streak of red can be seen in the sky as dozens of rocks rest on Embleton Bay in Northumberland below

 
The view of the Northern Lights from Stonehaven War Mermorial in Aberdeen

Aurora

 

View: The Northern Lights are pictured above Stonehaven War Mermorial in Aberdeen (left) and Thurso in Caithness (right) last night

 

 
The aurora was due to last for several hours before fading during the early hours of this morning

The aurora was due to last for several hours before fading during the early hours of this morning

 

 
The skies were lit up red and green last night as a spectacular display of the Northern Lights illuminated parts of the country

The skies were lit up red and green last night as a spectacular display of the Northern Lights illuminated parts of the country

 
 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2569881/Aurora-Borealis-Norfolk-Skies-East-Anglia-turn-red-green-stunning-display-Aurora-Borealis.html

Magie am Himmel – und in Deutschland…wow…

Wer mystische Polarlichter sucht, hat es in Deutschland gemeinhin schwer. Anders am vergangenen Wochenende. Da strahlte es bunt am Nachthimmel – allerdings nur dort, wohin sich das Licht nachts sonst selten verirrt.

http://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/natur/polarlichter-im-naturpark-westhavelland-brandenburg-a-955397.html

Watch out in the coming 3 nights, you might get lucky to catch Aurora Borealis

http://nypost.com/2014/01/08/solar-storm-stops-space-station-supply-run/

 

http://www.focus.de/wissen/weltraum/astronomie/sonnensturm-stromausfaelle-nordhalbkugel-sonnensturm-wird-heftiger-als-erwartet-2_id_3526836.html

Aurora Borealis – Warnungen

Aurora Borealis – Warnungen.

http://www.polarlicht-vorhersage.de/

Polarlicht-Warnung vom 09.01. – 11.01.2014

Polarlichtsichtungen in Deutschland möglich

Am 07.01.2014 ereignete sich ein Flare der Klasse X1.2 mit erdgerichtetem CME. Das SWPC gibt die Geschwindigkeit des CMEs mit 1064 km/s an.
Polarlichter sind in der Nacht vom 09.01. zum 10.01.2014 und in der Folgenacht möglich. Weitere Informationen gibt es im AKM e.V. Forum.

Mächtige Sonneneruption:

http://www.extremnews.com/nachrichten/natur-und-umwelt/173714b16a5acf4

…they are all so breathtaking – please Universe, let me see them in Germany….

http://www.welt.de/wissenschaft/weltraum/article123666191/Starker-Sonnensturm-bringt-Nordlichter-nach-Europa.html