Chagas – Ebola will be not be the last health problem we face…

 So basically, since there are blood donors spending also the parasites, it is already worldwide spread, through many ways, as we learn from the past:

The Blood Market of India

Middle East

Transplant Brokers in Israel Lure Desperate Kidney Patients to Costa Rica

Factor 8: The Arkansas Prison Blood Scandal

‘Kissing bug’ disease: Should you be worried?

Researchers at the annual gathering of tropical medicine experts on Tuesday warned of a deadly disease from abroad that is threatening the health of more and more Americans. They weren’t talking about Ebola, but Chagas, the “kissing bug” disease.

Called a silent killer because it’s often hard to diagnose in the early stages, Chagas is a parasitic infection that can lead to serious cardiac and intestinal complications and even death. It typically spreads through blood-sucking “kissing” bugs that bite on people’s faces during the night and is estimated to affect 7 to 8 million people worldwide. The disease can also be spread from blood transfusions, organ transplants and congenital transfer from mother to child, according to the CDC. Until recently it was considered a problem only in Mexico, Central America and South America. Over the past few years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has seen cases across half the United States, but in most cases the victims were believed to have been infected abroad.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2014/11/04/kissing-bug-disease-the-situation-in-the-u-s-may-be-much-worse-than-you-think/

Chagas & Europe

Special edition: Chagas disease in Europe
Editorials
The hidden Chagas disease burden in Europe
2
by P Albajar-Viñas, J Jannin
A note from the editors: Chagas disease – neglected
in Europe?
5
by Eurosurveillance editorial team
Surveillance and outbreak reports
Chagas disease in Italy: breaking an
epidemiological silence
6
by A Angheben, M Anselmi, F Gobbi, S Marocco, G Monteiro,
D Buonfrate, S Tais, M Talamo, G Zavarise, M Strohmeyer,
F Bartalesi, A Mantella, M Di Tommaso, KH Aiello,
G Veneruso, G Graziani, MM Ferrari, I Spreafico, E Bonifacio,
G Gaiera, M Lanzafame, M Mascarello, G Cancrini, P Albajar-
Viñas, Z Bisoffi, A Bartoloni
Chagas disease in Switzerland: history and challenges
14
by Y Jackson, F Chappuis
Chagas disease in European countries: the
challenge of a surveillance system
18
by L Basile, JM Jansà, Y Carlier, DD Salamanca, A Angheben,
A Bartoloni, J Seixas, T Van Gool, C Cañavate, M Flores-
Chávez, Y Jackson, PL Chiodini, P Albajar-Viñas, Working
Group on Chagas Disease
Surveillance of Chagas disease in pregnant women
in Madrid, Spain, from 2008 to 2010
28
by MD Flores-Chavez, FJ Merino, S García-Bujalance,
P Martin-Rabadán, P Merino, I García-Bermejo, A Delgado,
J Cuadros, Working Group on Chagas Disease of
Autonomous Community of Madrid
Research articles
Clinical, electrocardiographic and
echocardiographic abnormalities in Latin
American migrants with newly diagnosed Chagas
disease 2005-2009, Barcelona, Spain
35
by L Valerio, S Roure, M Sabrià, X Balanzó, X Vallès, L Serés
Perspectives
Targeted screening and health education for
Chagas disease tailored to at-risk migrants in
Spain, 2007 to 2010
41
by M Navarro, A Perez-Ayala, A Guionnet, JA Perez-Molina,
B Navaza, L Estévez, F Norman, M Flores-Chávez, R Lopez-Velez
The current screening programme for congenital
transmission of Chagas disease in Catalonia, Spain
46
by L Basile, I Oliveira, P Ciruela, A Plasencia, working group
for developing the Catalonian Screening Programme for
congenital transmission of Chagas disease
EuroTravNet: imported Chagas disease in nine
European countries, 2008 to 2009
52
by JA Perez-Molina, A Perez-Ayala, P Parola, Y Jackson,
S Odolini, R Lopez-Velez, for the EuroTravNet Network
Chagas disease at the crossroad of international
migration and public health policies: why a
national screening might not be enough
57
by C Di Girolamo, C Bodini, BL Marta, A Ciannam

pdf here:

http://www.eurosurveillance.org/images/dynamic/es/v14n01/v14n01.pdf

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